Six Secrets Behind Dive Center Hiring

Being an in-demand scuba instructor is about more than just passing your IDC and IE. You’ve got to have a friendly, winning attitude, sure – but also bring more to the table. We spoke with a handful of PADI Course Directors and IDC Staff Instructors, asking them to open up their playbooks when it comes to hiring. Here’s what they revealed:

6. Be able to teach at least a couple specialties.

“We like instructors who can teach specialties – and it doesn’t necessarily matter which ones. We are open to whatever they bring. As long as you can up-sell classes – that is, when a student comes in for one course, you have the potential to get two or three classes out of that opportunity.”

— Neil Evans, PADI Course Director with Rainbow Reef IDC in Key Largo, Florida

5. Have a relationship with the store where you want to get hired.

“Don’t just walk in off the street asking for a job. If you walk in off the street, I’m pretty suspicious of you. Instead, do the fun dives with the dive center and show your interest in getting hired, then do your IDC with that dive center.”

— Kevin Barry, PADI IDC Staff Instructor with Any Water Sports in San Jose, California

4. Know the dive sites of the location where you want to work.

“The PADI Divemaster course is where you get to learn the dive sites of a location. I always suggest that someone do their divemaster course and IDC at the same place. We are always going to hire people who know the local dive sites well before we hire someone who doesn’t.”

— Will Welbourn, PADI Course Director at Coconut Tree Divers in Roatan, Honduras

3. Knowing more than one language is a plus.

2. Be able to talk about gear – not just your own.

“It’s such a plus to be good about talking about gear and why it’s good to have certain types of gear. To boost your knowledge about what’s out there, go to different gear manufacturer websites and look at specs for different gear. Learn why you would use one type of gear over another. It’s important to sell not just the top-of-the-line gear, but the pieces that fit a customer’s specific needs.”

— Neil Evans, PADI Course Director with Rainbow Reef in Key Largo, Florida

1. Demonstrate helpfulness during your IDC.

“Quite frankly, it’s about attitude. Be the one at your IDC who is as helpful as possible, volunteering to carry tanks and set up equipment – that’s who you want working around you.”

— Will Welbourn, PADI Course Director at Coconut Tree Divers in Roatan, Honduras

If you are a dive professional looking for a new job, take a look at the Employment Board at the PADI Pros’ Site for open job opportunities around the world.

Article by Brooke Morton