Engagement and Productivity

Over the last decade and a half, “employee/work engagement” and “productivity” have risen as hot, linked buzzwords in the business community. Though definitions and measures of “higher productivity,” “better performance,” “lower turnover,” “better quality” and similar concepts differ, studies consistently find higher engagement correlated with them. Studies also find it correlated with a positive customer experiences. In other words, “engaged” workers do more, better.

What Does “Engagement” Mean?

Schaufeli (2013) acknowledges that “work engagement” and “employee engagement” are used interchangeably, but they have slightly different meanings. Simplified, “work engagement” may be defined as being mentally and emotionally connected to work goals and performance in a manner that motivates the person to further both, beyond expected minimums. “Employee engagement” is work engagement, plus an emotional commitment to the organization for or within which the person works that motivates furthering the organization’s reputation and interests beyond expected minimums. It’s important to note that “engagement” is not “satisfaction,” “happiness,” or “workaholism,” which can be high without engagement.

Rising Importance

Measuring individual worker productivity is increasingly difficult as “knowledge-based” services make up more of the economy. In many countries, as many as half of all workers create and use intellectual property rather than physical property, making conventional productivity measuring methods obsolete and unreliable. Impraise, a management software company, notes that “knowledge-based employees simply can’t be measured by the output of their productivity.”

Engagement behaviors, however, can be observed and measured, and their effects can be seen on the bottom line. For this reason, more and more businesses concern themselves with encouraging and measuring engagement behaviors and overall results.

The Takeaways

Much of the dive industry falls in the knowledge/service domain, making engagement central to increasing and sustaining productivity. Creating engagement is complex, with entire courses on how to do so, but experts seem to agree on a few common themes:

  1. Communicate regularly and personally. Frequent one-on-one communication with the dive operation manager/owner should increase engagement. Focus on purpose and how each person’s purpose fits in with it. They also need to know and see specifically how their efforts make a difference.
  2. Quality is often more important than quantity. This especially includes instruction. Beyond the more important safety issues, well-trained divers are more likely to invest in gear, travel and more training, and more likely to refer friends. So, training fewer divers well in a given time is likely more productive from a business perspective than training more divers poorly in the same interval.
  3. Dive businesses thrive on customer experience. Diving is all about customer experience, especially in training and travel. Engagement and customer experience tend to go hand in hand. Engaged employees and instructional staff have a passion for what they do and with whom they work that contributes to this.
  4. Trust. Knowledge-economy workers need relative autonomy and responsibility for managing their own productivity. This doesn’t mean ignoring what dive center staff does, but providing guidance and goals that allows them to get their work done without micromanagement.
  5. Results over effort. Recognize when people work hard and for long hours, but for most tasks focus on doing the right things well over simply staying busy. Reward innovation that saves money/time, expands services or improves customer experiences.

Adapted from the 4th Quarter 2018 edition of The Undersea Journal®, written by Karl Shreeves.

Creating Advocates

Written by John Kinsella

It’s a damp and dreary morning, the traffic is horrendous and it’s backing up for a long way. Perfect. Clutching a handful of flyers promoting a two-for-the-price-of-one Discover Scuba® Diving (DSD®) experience, we move carefully between the rows of cars, making eye contact with the bored looking drivers. Most roll down their windows, curious no doubt about our colorful one-piece wet suits. We smile, hand them a flyer and give them a brief explanation: Forget about all the traffic, now’s the time to learn to dive. By the time we made it in to the dive shop at nine, the phone was hopping off the hook. It was the single most-effective promotion we had ever run.

For years, we made a point of finding out why new divers came in to the shop. Before the advent of high-end dive management software such as EVE, we kept a simple spreadsheet with the diver’s name and a couple of words describing how they heard about us and why they signed up. We tallied this up every month and, with only this one exception, every month the dominant reason was referrals. Running around in rush-hour traffic in wet suits, it appears, is the exception that proves the rule.

That was 30 years ago, and I doubt we’d get away with it today. So that leaves referrals squarely at the top of the list. And, to drive the point firmly home, during a recent Open Water Diver course, every single one of eight new divers was there because a friend or colleague had personally recommended the course. This is a great example of Word Of Mouth Marketing (or WOMM) at its best.

The importance of advocates – those people responsible for word-of-mouth marketing and referrals – for your business crosses all borders. PADI® Europe, Middle East and Africa (EMEA) recently published a white paper titled, “Analysis of the UK Diving Industry.” This report summarizes the key findings of a comprehensive survey of PADI Dive Centers across the UK. It also offers advice, based on those findings, to help dive centers boost their business.

In the Marketing to New Divers section, the white paper points out that new divers are the lifeblood of your business. They are not just current customers, but future customers as well. It goes on to identify two pools of new divers: DSDs and potential trade.

For DSDs, the advice is to:

  1. Use the Discover Scuba Diving Participant Guide and system correctly.
  2. Include structured time during the experience to explain the benefits of full training and how to complete this.
  3. Give participants an incentive to sign up immediately.
  4. Make sure participants know that they can complete the skills from Confined Water Dive One during their DSD – they have already started the process.
  5. Incentivize your staff. The white paper notes that “Passionate PADI Professionals will convert students to the sport – be sure to support them and reward them for success.” If you can’t rely on staff to recommend your Open Water Diver course, and if you don’t help them do so and make it worth their while, you’re missing a cornerstone of new business development.

For potential trade (new business), the white paper advises to:

  1. Use the PADI logo.
  2. Make sure to use the dive center’s Facebook page effectively.
  3. Be innovative – reach out to your local community.
  4. Use your students – word of mouth is still the best way to attract new divers.

The white paper notes that “Personal recommendations are powerful recruitment tools.” Incentivize former students by offering them rewards for bringing you new trade. Examples include a free gift for each student they recruit; discount on their next course; or a discount on the course they persuade a friend to join.

Make sure to use tried and tested methods of creating advocates for your business and reap the rewards.

 

Meeting CPR and First Aid Requirements for PADI Courses

Some PADI® courses require first aid and CPR training within the past 24 months. You know that Emergency First Response® Primary and Secondary Care courses meet the requirements.

How do you determine what other courses qualify when a diver presents you with first aid and CPR qualifications from another organization?

Follow these steps:

  • Verify that the CPR and first aid training included student skill practice and demonstration of CPR and first aid techniques in person with a qualified instructor. A course that lacks this does not qualify, such as online only courses or self-study programs via any other media.
  • Check that the training taken meets current international emergency care guidelines as defined by the various resuscitation councils. For further information on layperson CPR and first aid training, visit the following ILCOR (International Liaison Committee on Resuscitation) Association websites:

American Heart Association

Australian Resuscitation Council

European Resuscitation Council

Heart and Stroke Foundation of Canada

New Zealand Resuscitation Council

  • For PADI Divemaster candidates, include a copy of that CPR and first aid course completion documentation along with the Divemaster Application to avoid unnecessary processing delays. Documentation must be from the qualifying CPR/first aid organization. Certificates or completion documents provided by third parties that are not directly sanctioned CPR/first aid organizations are unacceptable. Look at the name of the CPR/first aid organization for whom the instructor is authorized to teach and ensure it matches with the name on the certification.

If you’re unsure, contact a Regional Training Consultant at your PADI Regional Headquarters for clarification before accepting documentation provided by the student or candidate for course requirements.

The Heroic – But Failed – Rescue

Written by Al Hornsby

What do the following scenarios have in common?

  1. A certified diver surfaces near shore, gets swept onto rocks by the swell and spends several minutes submerged, regulator out of his mouth. The dive guide risks his life to reach the diver and tow him back to the boat. The deckhand quickly begins CPR and continues until reaching the marina, just minutes away. Unfortunately, the diver does not regain consciousness.
  2. A certified diver suffers a catastrophic injury at more than 30 metres/100 feet and becomes unresponsive. A nearby divemaster spots the incident and attempts to bring the heavily weighted, incapacitated diver to the surface, fighting a heavy swell and strong current. Reaching exhaustion, the buoyant divemaster loses contact with the victim before reaching the surface. The victim is found on the bottom deceased after a subsequent search.
  3. An instructor is asked by three certified divers to take them on a popular local dive. After non-eventful familiarization dives to confirm their skills, the instructor takes them on the requested dive. During the dive, at about 21 metres/70 feet, one of the divers indicates a regulator problem and begins rapidly heading to the surface. The instructor rushes to assist, slows the ascent and gets the diver up safely, then sorts out the regulator problem (which turns out to be imagined). The two other buddies, however, stay down and continue the dive. As the instructor takes the diver back down, the others pass them ascending rapidly with one completely out of gas. Upon reaching the surface, the out-of-gas diver begins to cough and panic. The instructor, who surfaced with the first diver immediately, manually inflates the victim’s BCD, and he floats high in the rough water, but nonetheless shortly loses consciousness. With a strong current carrying the group, by the time the boat and additional rescuers arrive, the victim has been unresponsive for an extended period. The diver is declared dead by EMS. The instructor who was attending him and the other divers throughout the several-hour ordeal ends up hospitalized for extreme exhaustion.

In all these (real) scenarios, there are various commonalities:

  1. The difference between what would/could have been a heroic rescue, at significant personal risk to the dive pro, and the diver fatality was heartbreakingly small.
  2. In the three situations, some combination of various errors and/or omissions could be alleged: an improper briefing/warning; improper rescue technique; improper rescue breaths; lack of available O2; etc.
  3. In addition to those common aspects, all three situations also resulted in the dive pro being sued, and all the cases resulted in negative verdicts or out‑of‑court settlements.

These, like any serious dive accident, were tragedies – for the victims, for the victims’ families and for the dive pros involved. Unfortunately in each, otherwise excellent, conscientious behavior and dive supervision had – or could be alleged to have had – small discrepancies that could be used in a lawsuit to attack the pros’ performance and/or response to the emergency.

Here’s a quick list of rescue-related issues to always stay current on and to use in a dive emergency to maximize the chances of success, but also to reduce the likelihood of a lawsuit that could reasonably allege that your conduct fell below accepted professional standards:

  1. Always provide a proper dive briefing, describing emergency and diver separation procedures and any special risks of the dive.
  2. Have operational, emergency O2 available, with all dive pros and applicable boat crew knowing where it is located and how to administer it, as well as being familiar with the dive boat/operation’s overall emergency plan and procedures.
  3. Stay current on and use the inwater, rescue-breath protocols you’ve learned, including when to give breaths, how frequently, when to remove the victim’s equipment, etc.
  4. Stay current on and use proper CPR protocols, including the sequencing and pace of inflations and compressions. Keep in mind that these processes have standards placed by dive and lifeguarding bodies, plus are supported by medical research and/or consensus of various sorts. These standards are mostly global, but there are a few that differ somewhat by region, so be aware of what is expected in your area. There are plenty of “experts” out there willing to allege that a nonstandard approach led to, or contributed to, a fatality: “If not but for the nonstandard, improper performance. . .”

Unfortunately, diving has risks that can never be fully eliminated, and the possibility of an incident occurring always exists. Stay prepared and vigilant, and ready to respond, using the procedures and protocols learned during your training. There will always be incidents that don’t have happy outcomes despite heroic, appropriate, individual efforts by dive professionals who do everything “by the book.” But even with real, human limitations, realize that diver rescues and assists occur every day, and the vast majority end without serious injury to the victim. Be and stay prepared for diver emergencies, but also be confident. What you know to do works and usually makes a difference.

Passion Equals Productive

Take a moment to think about what makes you productive. That is, what enables you to do things that benefit others – whether material, informational, spiritual or all three. Without productivity, success in anything can’t happen: it is, in effect, how we define success (and notice it’s not necessarily money or wealth). Some will tell you that productivity results from organization, luck and talent, but we’ve all seen disorganized, unlucky, ungifted people who produce and succeed extraordinarily. And sadly, sometimes we see the opposite. What’s the key element?

I think the musician Judy Collins put her finger on it. “Do what you love,” she said, “and you will find the way to get it out to the world.” That is, a passion for what you do is the one and only critical ingredient to high productivity. Zero in on what’s really important and productivity skyrockets, not because we do more things but because we do the right things. We stop wasting time on irrelevant (though often urgent) distractions that take us off task because we know where we’re going.

And, we work harder because we want to. Simon Sinek, author of Start with Why, wrote, “Working hard for something we do not care about is called stress, working hard for something we love is called passion.” Passion turns failures into learning opportunities, delays into new directions and challenges into creativity. If you are truly passionate about something, you don’t have to motivate yourself to be productive with it. You only have to find the ways.

In the PADI® family, there’s no shortage of passion for diving and the underwater world, and for changing the world by sharing both. It’s why we dive and how we share diving combined. PADI’s larger purpose is changing the world for the better. Every person we bring to diving adds to the political leverage and wise consumer choices we need to protect the seas and marine animals. It adds to those healed or who are able to help heal, or both, through the power of scuba. A growing dive industry creates jobs and adds new opportunities to global and local economies. And it all happens because you and I are passionate about diving. It drives us to produce. When we can’t find a way, we make a way.

The point is to nurture and preserve your love for diving, the oceans and those who share this love. It’s the key to being productive as a dive professional. It’s the heart of making the world better with diving. If teaching becomes more about getting students through mask clearing than that gleam in their eyes when they breathe underwater for the first time (believe me, I’ve been there), step back and reconnect. Make that cool dive (trip!) you’ve been putting off. Spend an hour with a buddy listening to whales sing, watching an octopus assemble its “yard” or whatever captures your fascination. Try that new suit, CCR, regulator or computer if tech is your hot button, or chase down that person who you just know will have a burning love for diving and can’t wait to get in the water.

Put first and foremost whatever makes you genuinely passionate about diving, the ocean and sharing them, and you won’t have to worry about how to be productive. You won’t be able to help it.

Written by Dr. Drew Richardson, PADI President and CEO

Technology Driven Travel Trends

Written by Ted Alan Steadman

The Digital Age may not be new, but changing technology opens doors while closing others. Maybe nowhere else is that more evident than in the world of travel.

Technology’s influence on travel has made it among the digital revolution’s most impacted industries. Travel agents of the 1980s and 1990s gave way to website searches and online bookings, creating a major shake-up for how we research, plan and execute travel. Back then, could anybody have envisioned the technology integration and convenience that modern travelers enjoy?

“Online travel agencies have been among the clear winners of the digital travel revolution, which has changed the way today’s consumers plan and book their trips,” says Angelo Rossini, contributing analyst at Euromonitor International, a global marketing research organization. “The next few years will see travelers requiring an increasingly personalized service, with companies able to suggest to them customized products on the basis of their profiles and past behavior.”

Our predisposition to being digitally connected around-the-clock plays heavily on consumer behavior. Tech-savvy travelers expect tech-savvy experiences through digital platforms. For instance, in its 2017 survey of major travel companies and professionals on five continents, travel commerce website Travelport Digital reported “90 percent of travel brands said that having a ‘mobile strategy’ is ‘crucial’ or ‘very important’ to the future success of their organization.”

Further evidence? Global hotel titan Starwood Hotels and Resorts knows the deep roots digital now plays with travel consumers. “Digital technology has changed the way we connect with guests, creating a 24/7 relationship in and out of stays,” says Stephan Croix, Starwood’s Vice President of Marketing. “With many travelers already seeking a more customized and local experience, truly personalized trips are already taking off.”

Where PADI Travel™ Comes In

This just-launched division replaces the former PADI Travel Network® with a more comprehensive, sophisticated and reward-based program designed with every segment of the global PADI® community in mind. Thanks to its technology, the dive travel experience can be easier and more profitable than ever for you. This new network gives PADI Dive Centers the ability to easily sell dive-destination packages literally around the globe, while PADI Resorts suddenly have a presence in the world’s most comprehensive dive travel platform.

To clearly see where dive travel is today, just take a look at the past. It all goes back to 1988 when John Cronin, PADI’s co-founder, had the idea of starting a travel company catering to dive travelers – a novel concept at the time. The original PADI Travel Network began as a wholesale tour operator specializing in dive vacations for individuals and groups, and was based at PADI Worldwide in Orange County, California, USA. It operated on the philosophy that growing the dive industry depended on what Cronin called the “Three Es” – Education, Equipment and Experience (the fourth E – Environment – was added later). After the first two Es, travel provided the experience he believed was crucial to keep divers engaged. In addition, he saw travel connecting PADI Dive Centers and Resorts throughout the world – hence PADI Travel Network.

Fast forward into the 21st century, and with the help of more sophisticated online platforms, improved visual presentations and mobile technology, PADI Travel revamps and reawakens the concept, integrating every aspect of the dive travel experience under one roof, so dive travel shoppers get exactly what they want.

“This is a completely new offering,” says Sandro Lonardi, PADI Travel Marketing Manager, who explains that people are becoming more independent when choosing their vacations and have higher expectations. They expect to manage their vacation experience with the click on their laptops, tablets and mobile devices. “We’ve designed the new PADI Travel to be the ultimate online travel agency for divers,” says Lonardi.

Navigating the PADI Travel space at travel.padi.com enables divers to easily research, compare and book dive vacations anywhere in the world, 24/7, through a directory offering one of the largest selections of liveaboards and dive destinations in the marketplace. With a click, PADI Travel site visitors find a user-friendly interface that informs, educates and empowers them to dial-in whatever experience they seek. “Dive travelers use search engines and social networks to research and plan their dive vacations,” says Lonardi, “and being on a website like travel.padi.com makes it easy for dive operators and resorts to be in front of their target audience. PADI Travel is designed to attract thousands of divers looking for vacations.”

What Customers See

PADI Travel includes more than 300 colorful dive destination guides with custom information about diving and traveling, marine life sightings, best times to go, best sites, discounts and more. About 300 liveaboards are represented with full descriptions, postcard-quality photos, alluring videos and more than 3,000 separate itineraries listed with availability, prices and other information for curious dive travelers. Along with PADI Dive Resorts, Centers, Eco Travel itineraries and Destination Guides, dive travelers have access to dedicated dive experts as well, offering personalized planning advice spanning 80 countries.

Dive travel customers are just one of the beneficiaries, however. PADI Travel sellers can register as affiliates to receive commissions and discounts. With the program, PADI Dive Centers with inhouse travel programs gain access to an immense selection of liveaboards and dive destinations as well as dive travel experts who can answer questions in advance. That access gives individual dive centers a global reach that would be prohibitive or difficult to maintain without the program. PADI Resorts, meanwhile, can earn support and business through PADI Travel’s interconnected network of dive travel sellers and registered agents.

To top it off, the aim is to maintain the highest customer satisfaction with expert customer support 24 hours a day, seven days a week. The travel program’s network of experienced dive travel experts – PADI Travel representatives average around 2,500 dives each – adds the personal touch that travel industry experts say is absolutely critical for travel professionals today.

Growing Dive Travel

“Creating and assembling PADI Travel has been a huge ongoing effort,” says Lonardi. “We can cater to groups and individuals alike. PADI Travel has harnessed the latest platform technology to combine the best of online booking with concierge-level travel consultancy.” Not only will PADI Dive Centers find it easier to sell travel packages and PADI Resorts will gain broader reach, but PADI Pros will also have increased opportunities for participation to help motivate dive travel sales.

For tech-savvy PADI Members who are on board with emerging digital marketing opportunities, many aspects of PADI Travel will be familiar. For others looking to implement a more strategic marketing effort, it carries on the PADI family philosophy of growing the overall dive community.

Speak Loudly

Ever leave a cylinder standing unattended at a dive site? Surface from a dive and prop your mask atop your head like a pair of sunglasses? Leave your snorkel in your dive bag instead of wearing it?

If PADI® Pros do these things – things that are outside the practices we use to train divers – it sends a message that it’s okay and appropriate. The message is audibly silent, yet visually loud. You’ve heard the adage, “Actions speak louder than words.” If your actions ignore the training principles you teach, why would your student divers and others around you think they are important?

Let’s take the snorkel as an example. If snorkels weren’t an important piece of equipment for scuba kits, they wouldn’t be required for PADI courses (except where they clearly have no purpose or are contrary to good practices as noted in some course standards, such as for ice diving). When a PADI Pro’s mask isn’t equipped with a snorkel, in essence this action says, “I require you to have a snorkel when you are taking a course. I teach you how to reduce your risk while diving by following course standards when I train you. The training I provide you helps prepare you to dive independently. But, when you’re not in a course, you can follow my lead and pick and choose which safety practices you wish to follow.”

There are relevant values for all safe diving practices. The PADI Open Water Diver Manual outlines at least six reasons for having a snorkel when scuba diving. Realistically, though, snorkels just don’t compare with other equipment (like alternate air sources and dive computers) in terms of managing risk.

So, why should you bother wearing one?

The answer is simple: Because having and maintaining good diving habits directly correlates with what you do under stress. The ability to think clearly declines in an emergency, and people default to what has become habit. If you’ve always worn a snorkel on your mask, and suddenly you find yourself on the surface with no air supply and you need to get yourself out of an entanglement, you can look underwater without the added stress of having to hold your breath because your snorkel is available when you need it.

Realize that when some accepted diving practices begin to erode, others begin to lose value, too. Outside of training, divers make their own choices. However, they are influenced by those they perceive as experts. Be a role model during your everyday dives, and choose diving photos for your communications and social media that depict good diving practices; and you will speak loudly (in a good way).

Achievements and Milestones

In 2017, you and your fellow PADI® Members helped improve the lives of more people than ever by opening their eyes to the magic of the underwater world. Dedicated PADI Pros issued more certifications than ever in PADI’s history, supported by the ever-growing number of PADI Dive Centers and Resorts around the world.

As a PADI Member, you play a pivotal role in making people’s diving dreams come true. Teaching the world’s most sought-after diver certification courses, you transform divers’ lives –your role transcends beyond diver safety and education because you’re also creating a global force for good that can drive positive change in our communities and the environment. Together, we’re positioned to help preserve our oceans for future generations. You are an integral part of a tribe committed to being best in and for the world.

Check out the list of PADI Members who reached 5, 10, 15, 20, 25, 30, 35, 40 and 45 years of membership in 2017, along with PADI Dive Centers that reached 30, 35 and 40 years of membership.

We are PADI℠ – The Way the World Learns to Dive®.

The Adaptable Prevail

Drew Richardson staff shotPut “adaptive” and “PADI” together and it conjures images of people overcoming disabilities and challenges, and rightly so. Diving is one of those rare, rich experiences that can help heal the body, heart and soul, whether someone’s dealing with PTSD (post traumatic stress disorder), paraplegia, cerebral palsy, amputation – the list goes on, as you know. With its performance-based design focused on what people can do instead of what they can’t, the PADI® System’s adaptive approach has opened diving and the underwater world to thousands.

Thousands? I should say millions. The PADI System’s adaptability isn’t new, and it benefits 25 million of us and counting – that’s every single PADI Diver. It has made PADI the world’s dominating force in diving because we all have challenges, needs, interests, preferences and desires. Only a system that adapts to the infinite individuality of learning and teaching can address all of these distinct variables.

What makes the PADI System stand apart is its ability to fi t a standardized diving instructional system to so many people individually, in so many ways. It is international, cross-cultural, multilingual and transgenerational, so that beyond accommodating varied learning needs and preferences it builds a bridge that makes us one amid our differences. Take five PADI Divers from China, Italy, Mexico, Russia and Vietnam and put them on a boat for a day. They share a language even if they don’t, because they “speak” diving and the ocean, thanks to the PADI System you and your fellow PADI Professionals apply every day.

The PADI System succeeds because it stands on a solid, unshakeable but adaptable philosophical and instructional foundation that retains our core values while evolving as emerging technologies and social trends change how we meet individual needs, one student at a time. As the PADI family stands up for ocean health and marine animal protection, and champions the power of diving in community, and health and wellness, we need to recognize that, hand in hand with tenacity, this is where our strength lies. Overcoming challenges requires adapting what we do, whether it’s to help one person with an individual need or one planet with a social need.

The Chinese philosopher Lao-tsu said, “An army that cannot yield will be defeated. A tree that cannot bend will crack in the wind. The hard and stiff will be broken; the soft and supple will prevail.” The PADI family has emerged as a force for good because we don’t try to live in someone’s idealized version of what the world should be. Rather, we are supple. We adapt and change to meet what the real world blows our way. Together, we always have, and I expect, always will.

Good luck, good teaching and good diving,

Drew Richardson Ed.D.
PADI President and CEO

The Undersea Journal – Third Quarter 2017 Now Available

3Q2017UJ_CoverEach quarter The Undersea Journal® is filled with stories and articles that help you stay informed and inspired as a PADI® Professional. In addition to the printed magazine there are several digital reading options for this useful publication:

  1. Via the Zinio app on your computer or mobile device. If you’re a digital subscriber, you receive an email notification that your publication is available for viewing on Zinio.
  2. Using the PADI Library App (Apple App Store | Play):
  • From your mobile device, open your Library in your PADI Library App, download and view.
  • On your computer, select Certification Paks from the Log In tab at the top of padi.com. From there you’ll be able to view the magazine in the Online Manuals portal.
  1. As a PDF on the PADI Pros’ Site. Log on to the Pros’ Site and click on the References tab. You can download the entire magazine or choose to download it in sections.

If you’ve opted for the printed version, it will continue to be delivered to your mailing address.