3 Reasons to Host a Conservation Event for Women’s Dive Day

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Since its inception in 2015, PADI Women’s Dive Day has received worldwide media attention – including mentions from The New York Times, Huffington Post and The Boston Globe. In 2017, more than 884 events were held in 85 countries.

Hosting a PADI Women’s Dive Day event is a fun and fulfilling way to promote your business and build community.  If you’re looking for Women’s Dive Day event ideas, or just want to level-up your event from last year, consider hosting an event with a conservation component.

Any PADI Member can create an event and get listed on the official PADI Women’s Dive Day webpage, this includes dive centers, resorts and individual members. The benefits of including a conservation component to your Women’s Dive Day event are three-fold:

#1 Bring in new customers
A volunteer activity can help attract new customers who might not have scuba diving on their radar – especially those who are age 18-35 (millennials). According to the Washington Post, 70 percent of millennials like to volunteer and Forbes recently reported two-thirds of millennials are willing to spend more on a product from a company with eco-friendly practices.

– Connect with local volunteer groups, or use MeetUp to find people interested in community service projects.
– Use MeetUp to contact women’s hikinggroups, kayaking clubs, or even women’s fitness. As anyone who’s helped with a beach clean-up knows, cleaning up the environment can be a workout! 

#2 Environmental benefits with long-term lifestyle changes
A beach clean-up has both short and long-term benefits for your local ecosystem. Studies have shown, volunteers who collect trash not only improve the health of local waterways, they also adopt environmentally-friendly lifestyle changes. After collecting dozens of plastic straws on a beach, it only makes sense that someone would pledge to never use another plastic straw.

#3 Gain media coverage
A scuba diving event by itself might not be newsworthy, but Mamas for Mother Earth or Divas Diving Against Debris is another story. A group of women standing around a pile of trash looking victorious (wearing your dive shop t-shirt, of course) is an image worth sharing.

– Invite local news media or prominent bloggers to attend your event.
– Contact local news outlets after your event and send them your best pics and video.

Putting it All Together: Dive Against Debris + DSD
On women’s dive day, 21 July 2018, have your certified divers can collect and log marine debris  using the new Dive Against Debris app (available for Android and iOS) while topside volunteers collect rubbish on shore. 

– Take a group photo with the trash pile
–  Award prizes for the most trash collected or most unusual piece of trash collected.
– Offer a free Discover Scuba® Diving voucher to anyone who participates in the clean-up to encourage new people to try diving.
– Conclude the event with a picnic or other socialactivity so sand-side volunteers have the opportunity to mingle with divers.
– Post to social media using the hashtags #PADIWomen and #PADIWomensDiveDay – your image or video may be featured by PADI!

Additional resources to plan and promote your event are available on PADI’s website. Check out out How to Organize a Clean-up Event and Conducting an Underwater Clean-up Off a Boat or Pier, and don’t forget to register your 2018 Women’s Dive Day event.

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